Kinect Hacked - Microsoft not Amused

Those clever people at MIT want hardware to be free!

Posted by Staff
Kinect Hacked - Microsoft not Amused
Microsoft's Kinect controller has been hacked. Microsoft is miffed. The people at MIT-backed Adafruit now have to pay $2,000 to the hacker. Shocked? We thought so.

AdaFruit is a company set up with the support of MIT, its 'Open Kinect' project stated:

"The Open Kinect project THE OK PRIZE get $2,000 bounty for Kinect for Xbox 360 open source drivers (now $2k)"

Well now, Nuigroup admin, AlexP, not only claims to have hacked the Kinect ("As a pure research project, I took on getting this awesome device to work on Windows.

"Here are the first tests of controlling the Kinect NUI Motor and reading the Accelerometer data from a PC.
Outlook looks good for other sensors (ie cameras and microphones) of the device."

For that, see the video below:

For its part, Microsoft told Cnet:

"Microsoft does not condone the modification of its products.

"With Kinect, Microsoft built in numerous hardware and software safeguards designed to reduce the chances of product tampering. Microsoft will continue to make advances in these types of safeguards and work closely with law enforcement and product safety groups to keep Kinect tamper-resistant."

Companies:

Comments

Kver 8 Nov 2010 16:03
1/7
I've always found the idea of companies making their hardware "Tinker-resistant" revolting. It's such a stunt on creativity it's depressing. Imagine making a piece of hardware and instead of closing it down... Opening it up! Not only would the cost go down (from not including dozens of "anti-hacker" tools or investing in the R&D) but people would get a much better at understanding your product and producing unique and compelling products coupled with it.

I know the US military experimented with using Xbox controllers to control various devices with a consistent and familiar interface; But because of these mechanisms and the cost with keeping up with them in addition to legal issues with tampering they moved to generic controllers. Kinect could be used for so much more, but instead of making it compatible with everything with open documentation, they choose to close it off. Depressing.
AC 8 Nov 2010 18:29
2/7
For Microsoft, their products are only used as leverage, not an end unto them selves. Microsoft, and Apple use their products and place in the marketplace to exclude competition and restrict customer choices. Frankly, anti "tamper" hardware should be illegal - or at the very least, Microsoft should be subject to strict liability when Microsoft products fail to operate properly.
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gingineer 8 Nov 2010 19:07
3/7
I think the technology is very exciting and has alot of potential. so i look forward to seeing what modders get up to with it.
Someone 8 Nov 2010 19:14
4/7
I don't buy locked down hardware. Software maybe, since it's easily replaceable. I own no consoles (unless they were gifted to me), and I don't see a point in doing so.
Trerro 8 Nov 2010 20:24
5/7
Wouldn't it make more sense to not only not lock it down, but actively encourage modding? Who cares if someone buys an XBox to be a cheap Linux machine instead of a gaming console? MS still gets the sale, the buyer still gets a product they want. No one is hurt by this.
roberto clemente 8 Nov 2010 20:45
6/7
@Someone so you do own consoles is what you're saying
not someone 9 Nov 2010 14:02
7/7
you obviously missed the bit about not buying (financially supporting the concept) but being given (using the hardware but not supporting the system). This means you can be in possession but not own a console.

simples
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