Final Fantasy Titbits

Details on Square Enix's RPG onslaught.

Posted by Staff
Whetting the appetites of avid RPG gamers across the globe, new details regarding the gameplay of Final Fantasy XII have emerged. The details are minor, but in light of the E3 demos shown over the past week, several things have become clear.

We now know players will be able to control three characters in battle, and that there will be no transition from a field environment to a battle arena, eliminating random encounters. Impressions so far indicate Final Fantasy XII lies somewhere between Final Fantasy XI and the overlooked Vagrant Story with regards to game design, combat and presentation.

In related news, Square Enix has revealed Final Fantasy I & II for GBA will receive a Japanese launch on July 15. There's no word on a western release as yet, but given the two games have already been given an English language makeover on PSOne, a UK release shouldn't be too far off.

And finally, Beta testing of Final Fantasy XI in the UK is to begin shortly. At present, Square Enix is filtering through thousands of applications for the Beta programme, and testing is expected to begin sometime this summer.

Comments

smagic 21 May 2004 11:38
1/10
I think final fantasy is great and it sounds like a turn for the best by ditching the random encounters. I have one question thats been burning in my mind.

Why do the male main characters of some final fantasy games look like lady boys? i.e tidus and this new guy in ff12.
Rod Todd 21 May 2004 12:08
2/10
For me, one of the worst things about FFX was that it didn't have any tit bits.
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kami 21 May 2004 12:42
3/10
Why do the male main characters of some final fantasy games look like lady boys? i.e tidus and this new guy in ff12.
---
Well, it's a japanese RPG.
Japanese RPG rule #17* clearly states the lead male must be a bishonen ^_^


*well maybe not rule #17, but it's one of the rules...

I personally hated the concept of having random battles. For one, there's the whole hassle of walking a few steps and suddenly having to go into a battle. It's probably one of the reasons why I've never fully completed a FF 8 or 9
smagic 21 May 2004 13:10
4/10
kami wrote:

I personally hated the concept
>of having random battles. For one, there's the
>whole hassle of walking a few steps and suddenly
>having to go into a battle. It's probably one of
>the reasons why I've never fully completed a FF 8
>or 9

Ye me too its ok early on for most of the games but then when your in an area with rock hard monsters and low on magic/healing item it can be a real pain. Some times i found the randoms to be so frequent that it interrupted the general flow of the game.

Being giving the option to avoid confrontation with the enemies in some cirumstances is good. I hope they don't put stealth in it though lol im sick to the back teeth of all this stealth now.

In ff8 you can learn no encounters with the diablo gf i think but i might be wrong because haven't played it for years. You can get no encounters one way or another in most ff games.

Joji 21 May 2004 14:23
5/10
Yes, it's true that the main characters look like lady boys. But this is part of japanese culture, for the same reason that most main characters are 16-18, because those are key ages in life, coming of age an all. This allows them to put more emotional content into the story lines like love triangles and stuff. Also everyone can relate to the characters more, and thus care more about what happens to them. Japanese people like to connect and care more than us I think.

This has worked on even me, but I feel it's a good thing to connect with the character/s. The look of the characters are important, and the bishojo/bishonen (confusion in these words) look is good for male and females to admire and connect with. Believe in or not, there are folk out east that are that cute and goodlooking. The same ideas are also used in a lot of anime and manga, and seem to work.
smagic 21 May 2004 14:30
6/10
Ah ha ha ha. The whole idea of it all brings a strange smirk to my face.
=)


On a Serious Note Thanks for the info i wasn't expecting to recieve such a detailed and thought provoking answer.
kami 23 May 2004 06:31
7/10
Joji wrote:

> Also everyone can relate to
>the characters more, and thus care more about
>what happens to them. Japanese people like to
>connect and care more than us I think.

> and the
>bishojo/bishonen (confusion in these words) look
>is good for male and females to admire and
>connect with. Believe in or not, there are folk
>out east that are that cute and goodlooking. The
>same ideas are also used in a lot of anime and
>manga, and seem to work.

Though I do wonder, do all the characters really have to be beautiful for the audience to be able to identify with them? I mean, looking at say the western equivalent of maybe a sitcom, it'd be labeled shallow and unrealistic if all its lead characters are purposefully beautiful.

DoctorDee 23 May 2004 11:17
8/10
kami wrote:

>I mean, looking at say the
>western equivalent of maybe a sitcom, it'd be
>labeled shallow and unrealistic if all its lead
>characters are purposefully beautiful.

Yeah, take "Friends" for instance. That Jen Ariston (well, she does go on and on and on) - A bowser.

Coutney Cox - You would't even let her into bed, never mind kick her out.

And Lisa Kudrow makes the Elephant Man look like Elle McPhereson.

That Elliot chick out of "Scrubs" - a pig.

The Mancunian nurse out of "Fraser" hit every branch when she fell out of the ugly tree.

Sarah Alexander, and Gina Bellman out of Coupling - bearded toothless hags.

The idea that western sitcoms would ever feature beautful people... it amazes me.
Joji 24 May 2004 01:01
9/10
Characters have to appeal to you, be it films, books or games. I know that you might be using Friends as an example, but in this same funny series you also so those same characters at their worst (cue the pic of Ms Cox as an overweight teen).

Of all the games I've played so far, I've found FFVIII's Squall as the most miserable and troubled. This was kind of a first for FF series as far as I know, this didn't stop me from playing it however. Other factors drove me to return to it.

Good looking characters don't always sell a game. Anyone remember a game called Urban Chaos on DC/PSone. This game had a black female lead character, but didn't get the credit it deserved. I could b wrong mind.
DoctorDee 24 May 2004 08:54
10/10
Joji wrote:

>Good looking characters don't always sell a game.
>Anyone remember a game called Urban Chaos on
>DC/PSone. This game had a black female lead
>character, but didn't get the credit it deserved.
>I could b wrong mind.

Not sure I get your point here, Joji. You seem to be saying that a good looking character doesn't necessarily sell a game... but then you go on to give an example that is atypical. Most game characters are not female (particularly pre-Tomb Raider), and most are not black...

I'm not saying black women aren't attractive, but that a black female lead character would be contrary to most people's expectations of a video game.

I'd agree though that a good looking central character is not enough, in itself, to sell a game. But if the game is good (or well marketed) it certainly helps. If BLoodRayne didn't look like she does, I'd prolly never have given the game a second look...
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